Stop Trying to Be Everything to Everyone

Adrian S. Potter
3 min readFeb 17, 2024

People pleasing is a zero-sum game.

Photo by Klaus Nielsen: https://www.pexels.com/photo/unhappy-diverse-couple-sitting-on-sofa-6303768/

The Secondhand Inspiration Project begins with a motivational quote and ventures wherever the creative path meanders.

Bonnie Gillespie is a multi-talented individual known for her work as a casting director, author, and coach in the entertainment industry. With experience in casting for film, television, and theater, Gillespie established herself as a respected figure, offering valued insights and guidance to aspiring actors and industry professionals.

She founded “The Actors Voice,” a popular online platform providing resources and support for actors navigating the complexities of the entertainment business. Additionally, Gillespie is an accomplished author, having penned several books including “Self-Management for Actors,” which has become a go-to resource for thespians seeking to take control of their careers.

Through her various endeavors, Bonnie Gillespie has made significant contributions to entertainment and continues to empower individuals to chase their dreams within the industry. Her quote –

“When you try to be everything to everyone, you accomplish being nothing to anyone.”

- remains a steady mantra for me. As a recovering people pleaser, this statement reminds me to resist self-sabotaging my gains to make other folks happy. It speaks to the idea of spreading oneself too thin and the consequences of trying to satisfy others without being mindful of our own needs. Let’s examine this quote’s essence and relate it to personal development.

1. Lack of Focus:

Attempting to be everything to everyone suggests a lack of focus on your personal goals, values, and priorities. Personal development often requires you to hone in on what truly matters to you and progress toward your objectives with clarity and determination.

2. Loss of Authenticity:

When you constantly adapt yourself to fit the expectations or desires of other people, you risk losing your authenticity. Personal growth involves embracing your true identity and aligning your actions with your genuine self rather than reflexively conforming to…

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Adrian S. Potter

Antisocial Extrovert · Writer and Poet, Engineer, Consultant, Public Speaker · Writing about self-improvement, gratitude, and creativity · www.adrianspotter.com