Four Things People Want to Ignore

Adrian S. Potter
4 min readSep 27, 2021

You cannot hide from the truth.

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The Secondhand Inspiration Project begins with a motivational quote and ventures wherever the creative path meanders.

“The truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off.” ― Joe Klaas

The human mind can be potent when used right.

But I have noticed a disturbing trend. Rather than tap into the potential energy of brainpower to imagine, create, and sustain greatness, many folks choose to rewire their minds to fool themselves.

Newsflash — lies and fake theories do not equal facts and reality, no matter how hard you wish for them to be true.

So here are four things people avoid confronting. I point these out not to criticize society but to nudge us into a course correction. Maybe I am deluding myself, but I think the world can change for the better.

1. All adults should take a civics and ethics class.

Many Americans believe the Constitution gives them the license to say anything without consequences.

Education in this nation has failed. The First Amendment says the government cannot stop you from saying what you want.

Go ahead and say what you will. But your words may cost you.

Mention uncouth, bigoted, or hateful ideas, and you might lose your career, popularity, and influence.

No law grants immunity from the side effects of making shitty statements. So please think before you talk or type.

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2. People would rather talk about goals than putting in work towards them.

Ambitions are important. You wouldn’t dream things if you didn’t want to achieve them. So why do people litter their lives with crap that has nothing to do with their passions?

Dan Gable was an exceptional wrestler, coach, and Olympic Gold Medalist. My favorite quote of his is, “If it’s important, do it every day.”

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Adrian S. Potter

Antisocial Extrovert · Writer and Poet, Engineer, Consultant, Public Speaker · Writing about self-improvement, gratitude, and creativity · www.adrianspotter.com